Height preferences in primitive tribes
#1
Height is regarded as one of the most important characteristics of men’s physical attractiveness and may thus serve as an initial criterion for women to decide upon further interest and engagement in a courtship situation (Pierce, 1996). Previous research in Western societies has shown that women prefer relatively tall men as potential partners whereas men prefer women slightly shorter than themselves (Pawlowski & Koziel, 2002; Salska et al., 2008; Shepperd & Strathman, 1989). Recent research has emphasized the significance of relative (rather than absolute) body height when studying men’s and women’s height preferences in a romantic relationship. Such research involves investigation of preferences for the difference between one’s own height and the height of a preferred partner (Fink, Neave, Brewer, & Pawlowski, 2007; Pawlowski, 2003). Taken together, these studies showed that both men and women adjusted their SDS preferences according to their own body height; however, a few participants chose the option of a woman being slightly taller than a man.

To date, ET LEAST two studies have reported data that question the universality of the “male-taller norm.” Sear and Marlowe (2009) reported that in the Hadza society (Tanzania), in 8.2% of 207 marriages the wife was taller than the husband, which was significantly higher than in Western societies. Sorokowski, Sorokowska, Fink, and Mberira (2012) reported data on SDS preferences of another traditional ethnic group—the Himba of northern Namibia. Contrary to Western societies, many Himba preferred partners of height equal to their own. This finding demonstrates that the “male-taller norm” reported in Western samples, was much less pronounced in the Himba tribe. It is known that people’s variation in body height is affected not only by genetic differences, but also by environmental influences. Lower height in humans can result from malnutrition, stress or various infectious diseases (Beard & Blaser, 2002). This is why it might be hypothesized that height preferences may be influenced by environmental and ecological conditions (e.g., in harsh conditions taller height might be preferred).

Height, similarly to WHR, might also be related to the reproductive success of an individual. Within Western populations, taller men had greater reproductive success (e.g., U.S.: Mueller & Mazur, 2001; Poland: Pawlowski, Dunbar, & Lipowicz, 2000) and the opposite relationship was observed in women (e.g., UK: Nettle, 2002). However, the results from populations of natural birth control are less consistent. For example, some studies showed the opposite correlation between male height and number of children (e.g., !Kung San from Northern Namibia: Kirchengast & Winkler, 1995; broad description of research about height and reproductive success: Sear, 2010).

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3474915/
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#2
Interesting. Maybe height is not such a natural preference after all.
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#3
(01-12-2018, 07:07 AM)rustavo Wrote: Interesting. Maybe height is not such a natural preference after all.

Just because 2 tribes care less about height than western people doesn't mean that it's not a natural preference. Frankly I think it's absurd to suggest that women don't have a natural preference for men who are taller than them, or that men don't prefer shorter women.
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#4
(01-12-2018, 05:35 PM)crux777 Wrote:
(01-12-2018, 07:07 AM)rustavo Wrote: Interesting. Maybe height is not such a natural preference after all.

Just because 2 tribes care less about height than western people doesn't mean that it's not a natural preference. Frankly I think it's absurd to suggest that women don't have a natural preference for men who are taller than them, or that men don't prefer shorter women.

I must concur with that.  I have less respect now than I did before for ncbi.nlm.nih.gov. Two primitive tribes or societies in Africa - one society/tribe still have the women preferring taller men 91.8% of the time according to the stat above, and the other according to the above - "many Himba preferred partners of height equal to their own".  I mean this wording is a joke.  It means absolutely nothing.  "Many Himba preferred partners of height equal to their own"???  How "many"?  You can't do a legitimate study and generalize with such vague terms and have it be taken seriously.  And why would the "researchers" seek out some primitive tribes and compare the women's height preferences against those of so-called "Western societies" - to show that primitive tribes are more "egalitarian"?!  LOL

If you read Jonathan Rauch's 1995 Economist article - here - it states:

"In the 1960s and 1970s, Thomas Gregor, an anthropologist at America's Vanderbilt University, lived among the Mehinaku, a tropical forest people of central Brazil who were amazed by such new-fangled gadgets as spectacles. Among the Mehinaku, attractive men should be tall: they are respectfully called wekepei. Woe unto the peritsi, as very short men are derisively called (it rhymes with itsi, the word for penis). Where a tall man is kaukapapai, worthy of respect, the short one is merely laughable. His lack of stature is a moral as well as physical failing, for it is presumed to result from sexual looseness during adolescence.

"No one wants a peritsi for a son-in-law," Mr Gregor writes. By many measures--wealth, chieftainship, frequency of participation in rituals--tall men dominate in tribal life. They hog the reproductive opportunities, too. Mr Gregor looked at the number of girlfriends of Mehinaku men of varying heights. He found a pattern: the taller the man, the more girlfriends he had. As he explained, "the three tallest men had as many affairs as the seven shortest men, even though their average estimated ages were identical.""


Women's preference for men taller than them is universal.  I say this not to depress short men, but just to give the facts as I see them.  At the end of his 1995 article he states:

For centuries, short men have shrugged their shoulders and carried on. They, at least, still see themselves, and are seen by others, as variegated individuals, not as a monotonal social group. That may be the best approach to all such human characteristics."

This finish would indicate to me that he believes this.  Jonathan Rauch is Gay.  It is estimated that Gays are about 2% of the population.  And Rauch sure as hell wants his Gay rights.  Yet short people constitute a much larger percentage of the population and he refers to them as "variegated individuals" and should "shrug their shoulders and carry on".  This is hypocrisy of the First Order.  He's got his rights so he doesn't give a F**k, and his height is a solid 5'10", not tall, just average, so he faces no real heightism.  Other than that his article is good as far as presenting the facts, however it discourages any kind of activism for Rights on the part of the short.
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